FTI Writing for Games Course (Day 3)


The third session focused on characters.

Initially we looked at the features and attributes of a Player Character – PC  (as opposed to a Non Player Character  –NPC) and discussed “Player Verbs” and game mechanics. Player verbs determine HOW a story can be told. For example if a player can walk and collect things, the story can be delivered by exploring a scene and examining objects. Player verbs are supported by the game mechanics e.g. Press and hold X to do [player verb].

I found this very interesting article on Gamasutra but here is a short exert on the subject:

The lower the number of player verbs, the easier it is to control the variables and rein in scope. However, a low number of verbs can result in more and more onus being put on out-of-game narrative mechanisms to convey a story. For example, if all the player verbs in a game have to do with combat and none have to do with traversal movement, then how will you bridge from one combat context and location to another? With no option to provide the player an interactive journey from Point A to Point B, you will likely lean upon noninteractive storytelling techniques to establish a change of location and a new reason and context for the next battle. This can range from the simple, five-second panning of images in between Angry Birds worlds all the way up to the sumptuously rendered, ten-minute cutscenes from the Metal Gear Solid series. As you make the hard decisions about player verbs, keep in mind that the more narrow your focus in this area, the more you might be overburdening the noninteractive narrative tools at your disposal.

Another point to consider with regard to player verbs is that people and fictional characters are, in many ways, defined by the choices they make and what they do. In a game, a playable character ends up doing only the things the designers allow. Thus, the gameplay verbs that are available to a player character define, in a very basic way, who that character is. It’s important to realize that player verbs and the player’s character are inextricably interwoven, and should be concepted and developed concurrently.

Further, if you are using a pre-existing character as a (or the main) playable in your game, be aware that the character may come with baggage that includes a bevy of implied verbs. Spider-Man, for example, has inherent wall-crawling and web-swinging abilities that can cause waking nightmares for your level designers and camera designers/engineers. Other characters may imply other abilities.

We then went on to look at NPCs and relationship systems. The example of a relationship system Anthony used was an in-game shop, where if a player spends more than X dollars, the shopkeeper provides a 10% discount for future purchases. A cool game that includes a complex relationship system is  the teenage horror game, Until Dawn. Not only does the PC switch between NPCs but relationships are formed based on your interactions as the PC.

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FTI Writing for Games Course (Day 1)


Thankfully I have some amazing friends, else I wouldn’t have known about the FTI Writing for Games course that started this week. I was delighted to get the heads-up from those who know me best, and promptly booked in to the six week course run by Anthony Sweet.

Anthony started his own company in Perth called, Hand Written Games (awesome name huh?) and works as the lead designer at Black Lab Games. The man has a wealth of information about the industry based on his experience in Perth. This is valuable for us local writers who want to understand how to compete in this small, niche industry.

I thought I’d write a short post after each session to capture my thoughts and learnings – so here goes:

Day/Night 1

The room was full of bright-eyed guys and gals from all different backgrounds. We introduced ourselves by saying our name and the last game we played (mine was Oxenfree) and consequently, I just downloaded episode 1-5 of the Life is Strange series on Steam.

Anthony explained the role of the Games Writer Narrative Designer and where, typically, the role fits in to the Game Production Process. This was something I found particularly interesting because the Narrative Designer is often brought in quite late in the game’s development phases. Initially I thought the narrative would drive the game design rather than the other way around, but then I made some comparisons with my own profession – Software Engineering – and it made complete sense. Let me explain –

In an ideal world, user stories and requirements should drive the design of software but often the particular system or technology platform that we are building upon has plenty of constraints. This means we tend to prioritise requirements that better fit within these constraints and push back on those ‘pie in the sky’ ideas that would be really cool, but are going to be EXTREMELY hard to implement (Me with my project manager hat on is now underlining $$$$ on the whiteboard while client frowns and developers chew their nails nervously).

My projects are smoother, more agile and deliver better outcomes when 80% of the design is decided before the client turns up for the kick-off meeting. We give them their 20% to go wild with and usually this is enough to create a happy balance.

So it sounds like indie Game production follows the same sort of principles. The game engine, existing artefacts and artwork dictate approx. 80% of the design and so the Narrative Designer has 20% left to work with. If they can understand the constraints, massage the narrative to remove unnecessary complexity and patch the “gaps” (in the other 80%) with some fancy-fiction, then they will be a truly valuable resource to the team.

We looked at a few case studies in the class but the one that stood out was, Freedom Fall by our local StirFire Studios. There is no dialogue in the games and the narrative is delivered through sassy graffiti scrawled across the walls of the background. It really demonstrated how a small amount of text could provide so much insight into the game’s narrative and characters. This has now inspired me to learn the art of the Haiku – a little says a whole lot. So here is one I whipped up after reading the supplied blog post by David Gaider: http://www.polygon.com/2016/8/15/12455728/how-to-get-a-job-writing-games-maybe

Not sugar-coated,

writing for games is tricky.

but I still want in!

// Note: Haikus are hard! Everything I want to say has 4 –  not 5 syllables!