FTI Writing for Games Course (Day 3)


The third session focused on characters.

Initially we looked at the features and attributes of a Player Character – PC  (as opposed to a Non Player Character  –NPC) and discussed “Player Verbs” and game mechanics. Player verbs determine HOW a story can be told. For example if a player can walk and collect things, the story can be delivered by exploring a scene and examining objects. Player verbs are supported by the game mechanics e.g. Press and hold X to do [player verb].

I found this very interesting article on Gamasutra but here is a short exert on the subject:

The lower the number of player verbs, the easier it is to control the variables and rein in scope. However, a low number of verbs can result in more and more onus being put on out-of-game narrative mechanisms to convey a story. For example, if all the player verbs in a game have to do with combat and none have to do with traversal movement, then how will you bridge from one combat context and location to another? With no option to provide the player an interactive journey from Point A to Point B, you will likely lean upon noninteractive storytelling techniques to establish a change of location and a new reason and context for the next battle. This can range from the simple, five-second panning of images in between Angry Birds worlds all the way up to the sumptuously rendered, ten-minute cutscenes from the Metal Gear Solid series. As you make the hard decisions about player verbs, keep in mind that the more narrow your focus in this area, the more you might be overburdening the noninteractive narrative tools at your disposal.

Another point to consider with regard to player verbs is that people and fictional characters are, in many ways, defined by the choices they make and what they do. In a game, a playable character ends up doing only the things the designers allow. Thus, the gameplay verbs that are available to a player character define, in a very basic way, who that character is. It’s important to realize that player verbs and the player’s character are inextricably interwoven, and should be concepted and developed concurrently.

Further, if you are using a pre-existing character as a (or the main) playable in your game, be aware that the character may come with baggage that includes a bevy of implied verbs. Spider-Man, for example, has inherent wall-crawling and web-swinging abilities that can cause waking nightmares for your level designers and camera designers/engineers. Other characters may imply other abilities.

We then went on to look at NPCs and relationship systems. The example of a relationship system Anthony used was an in-game shop, where if a player spends more than X dollars, the shopkeeper provides a 10% discount for future purchases. A cool game that includes a complex relationship system is  the teenage horror game, Until Dawn. Not only does the PC switch between NPCs but relationships are formed based on your interactions as the PC.

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FTI Writing for Games Course (Day 2)


In this session, we took the classic writing rule of “show, don’t tell, and reshaped it to apply to interactive game narrative, so it became “interact, don’t show.” The idea is that you should allow/encourage a player to interact with an object or scene to build an understanding of their world or circumstance, instead of spelling everything out with visuals and/or text. An example of a game that does this extremely well (in my opinion) is Gone Home. The player returns to their empty family home with little or no context of who they or their family members are. The whole game is about exploring the house and interacting with objects, such as photos, notes, audio recordings, personal effects etc, to uncover the family history and the game’s underlying narrative.

The question was then raised – how do you deliver exposition to players? Our presenter then explained lots of interesting ways games are explaining the “detail of what is going on” in the form of character diaries, audio recordings, historic documents, news stories (overheard), emails etc. Very cool.

We then went on to talk about meaningful choice in games, using Tell Tale’s the walking dead as a case study. Tell Tale Games base their games on episodic events and strong narrative that require choices rather than exploration or action.  In the Walking Dead, the player has to make many choices throughout the game, some being simple dialogue selection and some being meaningful choices (these have an impact on the player and sometimes AI). An example of a meaningful choice might be to save or to kill another character. This calls on the player to consider their own beliefs or attitudes in the game. We learned that meaningful choices are expensive and introduce risk during game development so a good narrative designers want to give players the illusion of meaningful choice.

Finally we discussed Generative narrative and authored vs systemic narrative. This prompted me to look up an old game called, Dwarf Fortress, which is touted as the most systematic immersive game ever created. Interesting stuff!

Journey Review


Journey, produced by Thatgamecompany and published by Sony Computer Entertainment for PS3 on March 13 2012

This beautifully unique and magically presented game tells its story without words, leaving awestruck players to develop their own theories for the purpose, lesson and conclusion of the journey. Here are my own:

I’ll cut to the chase; Journey is about life – all of it, simplified into 2-3 hours of tranquil, curious play. The subject is very topical for me at the moment as I am a new mother of a 9-month-old baby girl. Watching her grow and learn about herself and the world around her is an entertaining joy and so is Journey because it invokes a similar wonder and pleasure.

Puer (the name I’ve given our cloaked protagonist) is reincarnated from the stars to find himself with very little knowledge about his world (a windy, undulating desert) and limited ability to communicate or move around – just like a baby. The landscape is awe-inspiring and vast and Puer seems so small and insignificant. As he moves through his journey, he slowly gains skills and understanding; now he can have a bigger impact on the world around him. He meets and takes guidance from others who help him along the way (cloth creatures and spirits). He slowly grows and ages, although this is not visible of his character, it is the made apparent by the environment around him. Suddenly there are more complex problems to solve, histories to understand and a visual richness bringing to light detail that makes the mind wonder and guess at the past.

Puer’s scarf seems to represent knowledge and his life force. As he discovers and interacts with his world it grows in length and gives him power to move more easily through his environment. At the same time, the history of his world is slowly revealed. A once thriving population lived within a great city but the introduction of technology and eventual war caused the fall of the civilization. This history lesson is an important part of Journey. As Puer uncovers the past, he has aspirations for his future – knowledge is power, actions have consequences, be better than those before you. You feel a sadness at the loss of something once great and it drives you to want to ‘fix’ the world, but that is not the purpose of your Journey.

By the time Puer reaches the snow-covered mountain (the mother), he has aged substantially. His scarf is covered in frost, hindering his power to float and fly. It also represents the cloudiness in his knowledge – it is still there but it can’t be easily accessed. Puer’s movements are slow, impeded by powerful icy winds. Friends hover far away, high in the sky and are no longer much help. Some die around him, reminding him of his own dwindling mortality. Foes are lurking around every corner. The world has become a scary, difficult place.

Thankfully as he nears the end, Puer has a chance to be free of the shackles of age once more. He accepts his fate and returns to the source of all life – the mountain peak. Now he lives in his mind and is free of the burden of his body. He remembers the good times, his relationships and how far he has come. He finds peace and at that moment he is ready to die. As his soul is released from his body, it is returned to where it all began…

A cloaked being awakes in the dunes, ready to begin a new journey.

 

The game story gets 5/5 symbol stars. The fact that much of it is up for interpretation is a tribute to its intricate and personal subject – life.

Good Gaming – An Update


Some time ago I wrote a post about my gaming history. Video games have been a big part of my life and have brought me hours of enjoyment over many years. This week a few uncanny occurrences caused me to rethink what gaming means to me today. So what happened,  you ask. Well…

Firstly, I came out of a post natal depression funk (the reasons I haven’t posed here for some months) and realised the thing I wanted to do most was play games. I’d been advised to ‘remember what I liked doing’ and ‘do it’ again. Depression has a way of sapping all your desire to do anything aside for feel tired and shitty, but somehow I scrapped together enough gusto to go out and buy a game I’d heard a lot about – Journey.

Secondly, I got a response back from a reputable game development company in Mexico (my most favourite place), after I’d offered my creative writing services. They were keen to have me collaborate on a game they were currently developing in Spanish with an aim to translate and localise for English speaking countries. Holy Guacamole!

Finally, a film producer friend contacted me and revealed he was making a documentary about women in games (players, developers, designers etc). After some discussion he suggested that I be the ‘backbone’ of the story – using my gaming history, career choice and recent dabbling in games writing as the core content. Exciting!

So, here I am again, reflecting on the role of gaming in my life. I thought I’d try and list the games I remember playing, despite knowing many have been lost to the foggy mire of my terrible memory. Anyway, here goes (in no particular order and not listing versions):

 PC  Arcade  Console
 Firepower  TMNT  Mario Brothers
 Packman  Golden Axe  Snack Rattle n Roll
 Tetris  Mortal Kombat  Yoshi’s Island
 F-18 Interceptor  Tekken  Donkey Kong
 Indiana Jones  Ghouls n Ghosts  Loaded / Reloaded
 Bubble Bobble  Time Crisis  Need for Speed
 Super Frog  Buck Hunter  Oddworld
Kings Quest  Duck Hunt  Crash Bandicoot
Quest for Glory  Galaga  Silent Hill
 Space Quest  1943  Assassin’s Creed
Heroes’ Quest  X-men  GT
 Giana Sisters  Point Blank  Halo
Road Rash  Tekken  Star Wars
 Kick Off  Street Fighter  Splinter Cell
 Marble Madness  Space Invaders  Call of Cthulhu
 Heimdall  Destroy All Humans
 Moonstone  GTA
 Lemmings Call of Duty
 Legend of Kyrandia  Red Dead Redemption
 Elder Scrolls  The Matrix
Curse of Enchantica  God Of War
 Prince of Persia  Heavy Rain
 Double Dragon  Borderlands
Altered Beast  Starsky and Hutch
 Myst  Portal
 Square Heroes  Journey
 Diablo
 Time Splitters

I know there are plenty more I have just forgotten about but still it was fun recalling those who have stuck with me. I highlighted some my favourites in each category. As you can see, my preferred platform is console but I’m planning on hitting the PC again since there is just so much awesomeness on Steam (I’m thinking Limbo next).

I hope this post has stirred up your gaming memories 🙂 Let me know if you think I’ve missed any epics.

 

Seeking Representation – Indie authors and agents (Part 3)


(This post is a follow on from Part 2 where I discuss querying overseas agents)

Since deciding to seek representation for my work, I’ve done a lot of research about the right, and more importantly, the wrong way to approach the agent querying process. Like all paths to professional writing, taking a wrong direction can be harmful to your reputation and put you miles behind the vast competition. The old, gung-ho, anything is possible as long as you want it bad enough me would have begun firing off hopeful, passionate query letters to anyone who’d listed an address, but the new me has learned that in this fickle, over-populated industry, you must plan, tailor and target any communications to those in the biz, else your message will be discarded before it is even read.

Although I have only sent a single query, which returned the response: “We are not taking on anymore clients currently,” I’m still going to stand on my soapbox and advise you to do some research of your own before sending any query letters. I wrote a post: Seeking Representation – Indie authors and agents (Part 2) which briefly talks about how you might select agencies or an agent to query but there is a lot more that could be read on that topic. I’d recommend posts such as The 10 Dos and Don’ts of Writing a Query Letter and The Worst Ways to Begin Your Novel: Advice from Literary Agents. Also read this free and fantastically informative eBook (written by agent, Noel Lukemen).

Soon I will be writing a summary of the key points in Noel’s book, relating to works of FICTION. To give you a sneak-peak into that post though, the first key point is going to be… Research! Research the agencies that will be most likely to read and represent your work. Research how to write a good solid query letter and research your closest competitors. More soon.

Seeking Representation – Indie authors and agents (Part 2)


(This post is a follow on from Part 1 where I discuss the value of a good agent and some querying gotchas)

Ok, so perhaps you’ve tried to get a writer’s agent but so far all you’ve heard is: “I’m sorry, but we are not taking on new clients at this time.” You’ve moved down the list (e.g. the Australian Literary Agent’s association members) and you are now approaching the bottom. Your next question may be: “Can I use an agent outside of my country of residence?” Well, the answer is “Yes but be smart about it!”

If you want to query an overseas agent or publisher, make sure your manuscripts’ subject/setting are aligned with the agent’s location. Agents generally focus their selling efforts in their own countries, where they know the market and are easily able to maintain the contacts and business connections a successful agent needs. Generally, publishers will also only be interested in content that is interesting and saleable to their local market.

In my case, the Ruthless Series is set in San Francisco, USA. I will therefore consider pitching to US agents, along with Australian agents. So far I haven’t tried but I have done some research to start identifying which agents may be interested in my work (this is very important – there is no point pitching to an agent or publisher that clearly doesn’t represent your genre).

There are some other interesting articles about querying overseas agents such as http://writeitsideways.com/how-to-query-literary-agents-from-other-countries/

Have a read and do some research before you decide to branch out into other publishing markets. In my next post I’ll provide some more insight into the querying process.

 

 

Seeking Representation – Indie authors and agents (Part 1)


When I was almost ready to publish my first book, I did my due diligence and looked into my options. There was of course traditional publishing, through one of many Australian publishing agencies, or self-publishing, through a service such as CreateSpace or KDP (Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing). I chose the latter based on a number of writer’s seminars I’d attended and the fact it was going to be a great deal easier than begging and pleading with publishers. I also wanted to see how my book faired on the market, getting direct and real feedback from readers rather than publishers (if lucky enough to even be assessed/read).

So now, after two self-published books, I feel I have a product and something people like and want to read. If I were a marketing guru and didn’t have a full time job, I’d probably choose now, the month before I finish the final book in the Ruthless trilogy, to ramp up my campaign and really try and sell these suckers. But, I’m not (a marketing guru nor choosing this course of action). Instead I am looking towards traditional publishing options again and this time I am investigating the value of writers’ agents.

Writers agents (or literary agents) represents writers and their written works to publishers, theatrical producers, film producers and film studios, and assists in the sale and deal negotiation. More importantly in submitting to publishers, they target the editors/publishers who are best suited to your work, and thereby more likely to a) not reject your submission, and b) have the mechanisms in place to publish it well.

Through my research, I found that despite many publishers now opening the door to unsolicited manuscript submissions, few submissions, via this route, are actually read. Publishers generally rely on writers’ agents to sort out the wheat from the chaff. They are much more likely to read a submission made via an agent than via an unsolicited manuscript harvest. I also found it can be somewhat harmful to have self-published a book when seeking a traditional publishing deal. This is because, publishers want numbers. They want to know a product is saleable before they invest in it. When you are unpublished, this is a gamble the publisher will take based on the quality and content/genre of the book, but if you are published, they will want sales! Unfortunately, sales are not always a good representation of a books saleability (sounds like an oxymoron I know). This is because sales rely on marketing and in a flooded market like eBooks and publishing, if you don’t have good, consistent and snappy marketing, you don’t have good, consistent and snappy sales.

This is an interesting article that talks about the value of agents and why you should avoid submitting to publishers directly: http://editorialass.blogspot.com.au/2008/09/why-you-should-never-submit-unagented.html 

In my next post, I will gather together some good articles on how to find and approach an agent. This is all new to me too so I’ll let you know what I’ve tried and whether I’ve had any success soon.

Update: Part 2 now available

Attack of the Cheesy Sex Scene


Writing sex scenes… I’m not good at it. In my second book, Heartless (also second in the Ruthless series), I put my all into describing a somewhat surprising, yet passionate encounter between the protagonist, Ruth and another character. When I read it back, I found I’d written one single page of flimsy fornication. So I knuckled down, quashed the thought that had been circling in my head (All your friends and family are going to read this) and wrung out another half page. Not only was my ‘coitus chronicle’ short, it also sounded so… Cheesy! In the end, I vowed to never to re-read it again and moved on like it had never happened.

Now in the midst of the third and final instalment of the Ruthless Series, Soulless, I find myself limping through another scene of passion (I hope this is enticing you to start reading – even cheesy sex sells right?). Let me SHOW you what I’m talking about here:

Fever rose in Ruth’s stomach. The cool air of the night was suddenly undetectable. Her skin burned, fuelled by hot blood. It was as though Ruth was back in the depths of Hell, but she wasn’t, she was in heaven.

See? That is cheesier than a pub parmigiana. So, what can I do about it? Well, I propose that YOU write my sex scene for me. That way I can tell my nanna, with all honesty, that I didn’t write that page turning filth. I’m sure anyone could do a better job than me. If you are interested, let me know. I’m completely serious.

The chapter that busts your metaphorical balls


As a writer you are bound to eventually produce a chapter, paragraph or even just a simple sentence that doesn’t sit well with you. You won’t be able to put your finger on exactly what is wrong with it, but it will be like nails on a chalkboard to read.

These diction ditches can be quite damaging to one’s inspiration and motivation to write. I recently found myself avoiding my third manuscript because I’d already spent two sessions the previous week tweaking a troublesome chapter, and I couldn’t stomach facing it again (I knew it still wasn’t right). After a day off, I talked myself into tackling it, but this time once and for all. Instead of trying to salvage all the hard work I’d put into the chapter to date, I deleted it. I just plain removed it from my manuscript and started again. It was the best decision I’d ever made. In one session, I’d rewritten the chapter and set up the next. I also had my inspiration back and I was keen to move the story forward.

So if you find your metaphorical writing-balls in a vice over pesky phraseology and consequently you are spending all your precious time trying to fix it (with little or no results), consider throwing it out the window. Sometime that is much easier than trying to make it work. You’ll get over the time lost once you re-read your awesome new chapter 🙂

 

The Blood-sucking Author


There is a brand of Author (most often of the indie flavour) that peddles their wares in a somewhat dishonest way. I’m not talking about selling their books for more than they are worth, I’m talking about fooling people into attending seminars under the guise of a “writers workshop” when in fact they are purely sales and marketing opportunities. Subconscious sales are hidden underneath “You can be a successful author just like me!” propaganda, which is eaten up despite the glaringly awkward fact that the “successful author” is spending their weekend talking to a bunch of 50 year old women in a local recreation centre.

They warm the crowd with promise of riches and fame, despite having little or none of it themselves.  They tell the wannabe writers what they want to hear but offer no practical instruction or advice outside of what any idiot could figure out themselves. At the end of the “workshop” they’ve made 20 new fans who decide to spend another $20 on a writer’s self-help guide to actually finishing a book.

The truth is, anyone can write a book, but successfully marketing or selling one is very difficult. Success can elude the most talented authors – if no one reads it, who will know it is great? Telling people otherwise is cruel and wrong. It provides false hope and makes people focus on the wrong elements of writing. You may say “well at least it may motivate writers to finish their work” and you may be right, but that will only last until their sales inevitably fall short of J.K Rowling’s records. Then they will feel disappointed and worthless, when they should feel proud and hopeful.

I am often asked to provide advice to friends of friends or people I meet who know I have written books. I am always happy to help and relay my experiences and lessons learned through my writing journey. But I am always brutally honest. I tell people to write before they worry about attending writing workshops. Focus on creating and producing instead of marketing and making things perfect. You will have an opportunity to build your brand once you HAVE a brand, but if you haven’t actually written or published anything yet, don’t bother.

If you would like to talk to me about writing games or books, don’t hesitate to drop me a line.   My advice is free and devoid of “self-promoting strings”. Media@estherkrogdahl.me