FTI Writing for Games Course (Day 1)


Thankfully I have some amazing friends, else I wouldn’t have known about the FTI Writing for Games course that started this week. I was delighted to get the heads-up from those who know me best, and promptly booked in to the six week course run by Anthony Sweet.

Anthony started his own company in Perth called, Hand Written Games (awesome name huh?) and works as the lead designer at Black Lab Games. The man has a wealth of information about the industry based on his experience in Perth. This is valuable for us local writers who want to understand how to compete in this small, niche industry.

I thought I’d write a short post after each session to capture my thoughts and learnings – so here goes:

Day/Night 1

The room was full of bright-eyed guys and gals from all different backgrounds. We introduced ourselves by saying our name and the last game we played (mine was Oxenfree) and consequently, I just downloaded episode 1-5 of the Life is Strange series on Steam.

Anthony explained the role of the Games Writer Narrative Designer and where, typically, the role fits in to the Game Production Process. This was something I found particularly interesting because the Narrative Designer is often brought in quite late in the game’s development phases. Initially I thought the narrative would drive the game design rather than the other way around, but then I made some comparisons with my own profession – Software Engineering – and it made complete sense. Let me explain –

In an ideal world, user stories and requirements should drive the design of software but often the particular system or technology platform that we are building upon has plenty of constraints. This means we tend to prioritise requirements that better fit within these constraints and push back on those ‘pie in the sky’ ideas that would be really cool, but are going to be EXTREMELY hard to implement (Me with my project manager hat on is now underlining $$$$ on the whiteboard while client frowns and developers chew their nails nervously).

My projects are smoother, more agile and deliver better outcomes when 80% of the design is decided before the client turns up for the kick-off meeting. We give them their 20% to go wild with and usually this is enough to create a happy balance.

So it sounds like indie Game production follows the same sort of principles. The game engine, existing artefacts and artwork dictate approx. 80% of the design and so the Narrative Designer has 20% left to work with. If they can understand the constraints, massage the narrative to remove unnecessary complexity and patch the “gaps” (in the other 80%) with some fancy-fiction, then they will be a truly valuable resource to the team.

We looked at a few case studies in the class but the one that stood out was, Freedom Fall by our local StirFire Studios. There is no dialogue in the games and the narrative is delivered through sassy graffiti scrawled across the walls of the background. It really demonstrated how a small amount of text could provide so much insight into the game’s narrative and characters. This has now inspired me to learn the art of the Haiku – a little says a whole lot. So here is one I whipped up after reading the supplied blog post by David Gaider: http://www.polygon.com/2016/8/15/12455728/how-to-get-a-job-writing-games-maybe

Not sugar-coated,

writing for games is tricky.

but I still want in!

// Note: Haikus are hard! Everything I want to say has 4 –  not 5 syllables!

 

 

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